Monthly Archives: April 2008

JavaCC

I learned to use JavaCC these days. And I found that JavaCC is a great toolkit.

What is JavaCC?

JavaCC is short for Java Compiler Compiler. It is a parser or scanner generator for Java.

Java Compiler Compiler [tm] (JavaCC [tm]) is the most popular parser generator for use with Java [tm] applications. A parser generator is a tool that reads a grammar specification and converts it to a Java program that can recognize matches to the grammar. In addition to the parser generator itself, JavaCC provides other standard capabilities related to parser generation such as tree building (via a tool called JJTree included with JavaCC), actions, debugging, etc.

You can find a lot of language grammar and AST on its site too. I see that C++ and Java 1.5 grammar are there. JavaScript isn’t there. But I find out that Dojo toolkit’s JSLinker provides an ECMAScript 262 one. That is to say, you can create parser and parse C++, Java or JavaScript sources into your AST for any uses. Lots of great features can be imagined.

I spent about a week learning and using JavaCC. I completed a parser for an IDL language named CAR. I also built an Eclipse editor using the generated AST parser. Bang, all things seems working well: keyword hight-lighting, outline view, error probing, … Great toolkit!

Using JavaCC is quite simple, just download javacc-4.0.zip and unzip it, then following its examples tutorial. I sugguest you to start with JavaGrammars and VTransformer examples, as they are about Java grammar.

I think, later, given opportunity, I will try JavaCC out on other projects. Maybe my Java2Script compiler would be benefited from JavaCC.

P.S. Update:
There is a JavaCC Eclipse Plugin project, you can download the plugin to help you writing your syntax file.

Posted in C++, Java, JavaScript | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Moving Server Lesson

1. Moving server from IP to another IP may have a lot of problems. DNS may not be totally updated to all of visitor. So keep the old server running as possible.
2. Old content should not be removed immediately. Some visitors may visit your page directly and get cached *.html, which will try to visit old resources. Lots of 404 responses will occur.
3. Every page should be tested. Or bugs will fly all over.
4. All operations should be record so the next time, you can follow last time’s steps to save time.

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